What England legends mentioned in Three Lions by Baddiel and Skinner did next

Don’t wait around for updates – sign up for our daily football email newsletter today!

“Football’s coming home” has been ringing out across the nation after England sensationally defeated Germany in Euro 2020.

And millions of us know the lyrics of Three Lions off by heart.

The track was released for Euro 96, with the words penned by comedians Frank Skinner and David Baddiel while Lightning Seeds singer Ian Broudie composed the music.

It went to No1 before England were knocked out by the Germans in the semi-finals on penalties, but has since spawned several other versions and gone back to the top of the charts.

And now it’s helping get England fans dreaming all over again.

But what happened to the players referenced in the classic anthem and the voices of the pundits and commentators it features?

James Moore reveals all…

Bobby Moore

“But I still see that tackle by Moore.”

The former England skipper and West Ham star led the Three Lions to victory at the 1966 World Cup.

But it was his “perfect” tackle on Jairzinho at the 1970 World Cup when Brazil beat England 1-0 that’s referred to in the song. Pele called Moore the greatest defender he ever played against.

Also playing for Fulham and in the US, Moore had a spell in management after retiring and starred in the 1981 flick Escape To Victory.

He split from wife of 24 years Tina in 1986, marrying Stephanie Parlane in 1991. But Moore sadly died from bowel cancer two years later aged 51.

Do you think football's coming home at Euro 2020? Let us know in the comments section.

Gary Lineker

“And when Lineker scored.”

Now a top TV sports host including Match Of The Day the ex-Leicester and Spurs striker scored 48 times for England.

The goal referenced in the song is his equaliser against West Germany in the 1990 World Cup semi-final before the Three Lions went out on penalties.

Now 60 and worth an estimated £30million, he’s famed for advertising Walkers crisps. The dad of four has been married twice.

Sir Bobby Charlton

“Bobby belting the ball.”

This referred to the Manchester United and England midfielder’s long-range strike against Mexico in England’s 2-0 win over the side at the 1966 World Cup finals. He won the trophy alongside brother Jack.

Married to Norma since 1961, he later went into management and worked at United.

Now 83, he was recently diagnosed with dementia. Jack died last year after suffering with the same condition.

Don't miss a thing with our football updates!

Want to be on the ball with all of the latest football news?

Well then sign up for the brilliant Daily Star football email newsletter!

From the latest transfer news to the agenda-setting stories, get it all in your email inbox – don't miss a thing.

How do you sign up?

It only takes a matter of seconds.

Simply type your email address into the box at the top of this article and hit 'subscribe'.

And that's it, job done. You'll receive an email with all of the top news stories every single morning.

You can find out more information on our email newsletter on this link here.

Nobby Stiles

“Nobby dancing.”

The lyric pays homage to the toothless midfielder’s jig around Wembley while holding up the trophy after helping England to win the 1966 World Cup.

After brief spells in management after retirement, the ex-football hard-man worked as a youth coach at his former club United.

Married to wife Kay since 1963, he died in 2020 aged 78 after battling prostate cancer and dementia.

Gordon Banks & David Coleman

“What a save, Gordon Banks!”

Commentator David Coleman’s legendary line was about the spectacular save by England keeper Gordon Banks to deny Brazil’s Pele at the 1970 World Cup.

It has been hailed as the greatest save of all time.

Coleman, known for his “Colemanballs” bloopers, also fronted TV quiz show A Question Of Sport. He died in 2013 aged 87.

Leicester and Stoke goalie Banks won the World Cup with England in 1966 but later lost his eye in a car crash. The married dad of three died in 2019 aged 81 after fighting kidney cancer.

Alan Hansen

“I think it’s bad news for the English game.”

The top Liverpool and Scotland defender became a TV pundit for the BBC in the early 1990s, when England’s football fortunes were in the doldrums.

Now 66, the married star quit Match Of The Day in 2014 after 22 years citing “nerves.”

Sir Trevor Brooking

“We’re not creative enough. We’re not positive enough.”

The ex-West Ham midfielder, who scored five times for England and won 47 caps, briefly caretaker-managed his old London club.

Married to Hilkka, a former au pair from Finland, the 72-year-old also became a TV pundit and has worked for the FA.

Jimmy Hill

“We’ll go on getting bad results.”

A former footballer for Fulham who later managed Coventry, Hill became host of TV’s Match Of The Day in the 1970s and 80s and also worked for Sky Sports.

Married three times he died in 2015, aged 87, having been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.

John Motson

“England have done it in the last minute of extra time!”

Motty’s reaction to David Platt scoring a stunning volley against Belgium at the 1990 World Cup made it into the song.

Now aged 75 and married to wife of 43 years Anne, he commentated on thousands of games for the BBC before retiring in 2017, later returning to the airwaves with talkSPORT.

Don't miss a thing with our football updates!

Want to be on the ball with all of the latest football news?

Well then sign up for the brilliant Daily Star football email newsletter!

From the latest transfer news to the agenda-setting stories, get it all in your email inbox – don't miss a thing.

How do you sign up?

It only takes a matter of seconds.

Simply type your email address into the box at the top of this article and hit 'subscribe'.

And that's it, job done. You'll receive an email with all of the top news stories every single morning.

You can find out more information on our email newsletter on this link here.

Harry Carpenter

“England have got it in the bag!”

Better known as a boxing ­commentator, the BBC star also covered international football. Famous for his friendship with heavyweight fighter Frank Bruno, he died aged 84 in 2010.

Jules Rimet

“Jules Rimet still gleaming.”

The former French Fifa President was behind the first World Cup in 1930 and the trophy England players won in 1966 was named after him.

He died, aged 83, in 1956. The trophy, given to Brazil after the 1970 World Cup, was later stolen and a new one has been used since 1974.

  • England Football Team

Source: Read Full Article