EFL agree peace talks with the PFA over salary caps

EFL agree peace talks with the PFA in bid to avoid legal battle over salary caps in League One and League Two

  • The EFL have agreed to hold peace talks with the PFA regarding salary caps
  • PFA claimed limits set to be introduced in Leagues One and Two are ‘unlawful’ 
  • Clubs in two leagues voted in favour of caps of £2.5m and £1.5m respectively 
  • The EFL are willing to discuss amendments to the cap which could alter figures 

The EFL have agreed to hold peace talks with the PFA in a bid to avoid a legal battle over the introduction of salary caps in League One and League Two next season.

The PFA claimed wage limits were ‘unlawful and unenforceable’ after clubs in the bottom two divisions voted in favour of caps of £2.5million and £1.5m respectively last week, but are willing to talk to the EFL to see if a solution can be reached before the start of next season.

The EFL are willing to discuss amendments to the cap, which could involve altering the figures or the timing of its introduction. At present it would apply to all new contracts signed this summer. 

The EFL have held talks with the PFA in an attempt to avoid a legal battle over salary caps

EFL chief executive Rick Parry will lead the talks along with his PFA counterpart Gordon Taylor

PFA chairman Taylor is expected to discuss the issue with Parry during talks next week

But they will not back down over the principle that wage restraint is required to safeguard the future of numerous clubs.

Any negotiated settlement would then be put to the clubs to be signed off, with a two-thirds majority required to approve any change.

Clubs in League One and League Two voted in favour of caps of £2.5m and £1.5m respectively

If the EFL and PFA cannot reach an agreement, the dispute would be settled by an independent arbitration panel.

EFL chief executive Rick Parry and his PFA counterpart Gordon Taylor are leading the process, with talks expected to resume next week.

Championship clubs are yet to agree to introduce a salary cap due to disputes over the level at which it should be set.

An initial proposal to restrict annual salaries to £18m failed to win sufficient support.




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