Paddy Pimblett once "nearly beheaded" opponent with brutal fight-ending elbow

Paddy Pimblett's ruthless MMA skills were on show long before he joined the UFC.

Pimblett, 27, further enhanced his claims for a title shot in March when he submitted Rodrigo Vargas in London. Prior to that, in his first fight with Dana White's organisation, he KO'd Luigi Vendramini in Las Vegas – with both bouts earning him the 'Performance of the Night' honour.

But followers of Pimblett's career will not have been surprised to see him land on the big stage with a bang. A former featherweight champion with the Cage Warriors organisation, the Scouser has now amassed an 18-3 pro-record.

And it was the company where he scored one of his mist stunning wins, stopping Stephen Martin on his featherweight debut in 2014. The pair went head-to-head in Newcastle at Cage Warriors 73, and what seemed a cagey opening round exploded into life in the final minute.

'The Baddy' struck his opponent with a devastating blow that immediately drew blood. To his credit, a dazed Robinson made it to the bell.

However, less than two minutes into the second round, Pimblett then landed a savage elbow to Martin's head, with the ringside doctor promptly ordering a stoppage. The English fighter then celebrated wildly to his fans.

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Following the bout, middleeasy.com nicely summed up Pimblett's win with an apt headline that read: "Cage Warrior Paddy Pimblett nearly beheads opponent with a cutting elbow."

Pimblett has made many more headlines since that victory, but despite his fan popularity, after beating Vargas he admitted he didn't think he would be granted a tilt at world gold in the UFC anytime soon: “No, I’m not an unrealistic lad. That’s more of a 2025 thing," he told reporters.

"I’m just trying to take it one step at a time. Especially now the way my money is lad, if I’m fighting for this amount of money, I don’t want to fight anywhere near the title. Yeah, I want to be getting paid championship money before I even get to fight for the title."

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